Student-Run Clinics

The Department of Family and Community Medicine continues to play an active role in support of UCSF health professional students working in our free medical clinics in San Francisco. These clinics help meet the medical needs of homeless and other at-risk and underserved populations while at the same time providing an opportunity for our health professional students to develop their competencies and give back to the community. Under the guidance of UCSF faculty, interdisciplinary students work collaboratively to provide health screenings and engage and educate the communities their clinics serve. This has had a very positive impact on students’ career preparation for serving patients, working collaboratively with the health care team, and encouraging community involvement.

 

Clínica Martín Baró

Clínica Martín Baró

Clinica Martin Baro is a student-run free clinic providing primary care to uninsured Latino immigrants in the Mission District of San Francisco. The clinic operates each Saturday as a collaborative between San Francisco State University students, UCSF Medical Students, and volunteer UCSF preceptors. The clinic is open every Saturday and provides free physical exam, psychotherapy, medication, and lab testing as well as referrals for free and low cost specialty treatment. Not only does the clinic serve patients that might not otherwise have access to healthcare, for example due to lack of insurance, immigration status, or language and cultural barriers, it also provides learning and mentorship opportunities for its student volunteers. Since opening in January 2007, the clinic has provided free care to over 1000 Latino patients, with 225 served in 2013.

Homeless Clinics

Homeless Clinics

In 1991, UCSF Homeless Clinic was created by students with the goal of increasing care delivery to the growing homeless population in San Francisco, while also serving as a teaching opportunity for students. Partnering with the Tom Waddell Clinic of the SF Dept. of Public Health, the clinic offers acute care to shelter residents 2-3 nights a week with general clinics, women’s clinics, monthly dermatology clinics, monthly inter-professional clinics with pharmacy, and a weekly Women’s Support Group. The Homeless Clinic currently serves 20-30 patients per week, resulting in over 1000 patients per year. The clinic is open every Tuesday and Thursday evening from 6-8pm.

Mabuhay Health Center

Mabuhay Health Center

The Mabuhay Health Center (MHC) is a free UCSF student-run community health clinic that operates in San Francisco’s South of Market (SoMa) district. MHC runs monthly clinics at the Bayanihan Community Center, where student volunteers (undergraduate, post-baccalaureate, graduate, dental, medical, nursing, and pharmacy students) strive to deliver culturally sensitive health care under the supervision of faculty from UC San Francisco.

Patients from the underserved SoMa district, other areas in San Francisco, San Mateo County, and beyond attend MHC’s monthly clinics to receive measurements of vitals, health screenings (e.g. measurements of blood cholesterol, pressure, and sugar; testing for hepatitis B and HIV), vaccinations for hepatitis B, health education, medication counseling, and history and physical examinations.

Since an overwhelming majority of MHC’s patients are elderly Filipinos, cultural sensitivity entails navigating around "hiya" (a sense of embarrassment particular to Filipino cultures) and having volunteers on-site who are fluent in Filipino dialects (to facilitate health education and to encourage conversations—rather than monologues and misunderstandings–about personal health). The Center also tailors the content of health education workshops for youth to fit within the contexts of Filipino American culture and the South of Market community.

Mabuhay Health Center offers clinic once per month and serves approximately 16 patients per month. Approximately 77% of patients that MHC serves self-identify as Filipino. Approximately 45% of patients served do not have a primary care provider, and 43% do not have health insurance. The most common health concerns addressed by MHC include point of care health screenings for blood pressure, diabetes or cholesterol (41.5%), muscle pains (16%), hepatitis B education and screening (11%), and medication-related problems (10%).

Chinatown Hep B

San Francisco Hepatitis B Collaborative Mobile Clinic

Currently, the mobile clinic division is held at the Vietnamese Community Center in the Tenderloin in San Francisco. It is held every other month, on the second Saturday. Their sister clinic is held at the Chinatown Public Health Center on the second Saturday of every month. The mobile clinic is comprised of a cohort of health professional students that provide Hepatitis B screening to the general public, under the supervision of a preceptor. UC Berkeley also provides translators (Vietnamese, Mandarin, Cantonese, etc) at clinics, contributing to a more personal and comfortable environment for their patients. Their main purpose is to provide awareness and affordable care to at-risk populations (mainly Southeast Asian population). They engage in outreach activities, spreading awareness of their service to the community through flyers, word of mouth, and partnering with local community leaders.